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Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Those were the days . . .

So which prominent Canadian recently said this?

“When I studied Canadian history in my last year of high school, we concentrated a good deal on the evolution of our system of government from the Royal Proclamation of 1763 through the Quebec Act of 1774, right up to the Statute of Westminster of 1931 and the Letters Patent of 1947. This last document – the Letters Patent – is of vital importance and set in place the contemporary powers of the governor general which it transferred from the monarch. Yet it is virtually unknown to the general public. We also focused heavily on the King/Byng crisis of 1926; our entire class, contrary to most current opinion, thought that Lord Byng had done the right thing!"

If you want to know the answer, head over to Janet Ajzenstat's always interesting blog.

But before you do, please pause to marvel at the fact that once upon a time Canadian high-school students actually received a rigorous education.

Posted by Craig Yirush on June 30, 2009 in Canadian History | Permalink

Comments

That isn't rigorous at all - it appears that Canadian "history" is just a bunch of elites, dates and laws. Where are the people?

Posted by: Zebulon Pike | 2009-06-30 7:45:30 AM


How true. Sadly none of my children, the oldest being 31, were taught our history in school. I think that for the most part the teaching of our non revised history was dropped around the same time as our flag. There was also a lack of teaching grammar, spelling and composition. ZP from your comments you must be part of these generations who were deprived of traditional rigourous education in Canada.

Posted by: Alain | 2009-06-30 11:04:44 AM


I learned our history and I'm still young. The white guys are at fault for everything. Apparently they oppressed everyone they possibly could. So naturally their guilt passes to me.

Posted by: Sam T. | 2009-07-01 12:32:46 PM



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